EUX17 – Enterprise Storytelling

Enterprise Storytelling

Session Coordinator: Dan Willis, UX Consultant, Cranky Productions

A Story about Stories

Jana Sedivy (Principal, Authentic Insight)

Megan is a happy vivacious child.  But she got a cold with a bad cough … and one day it got so bad she couldn’t breathe.  Her mom drove her to the ER, but she had stopped breathing and was turning blue.  Her mom thought she was going to die.

Don’t you want to know what happens next?

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EUX17 – Leading Teams that Execute

Theme 2: Leading Teams that Execute

Theme Leader: Phillip Hunter (Head of UX, Amazon Alexa Skills)

Abstract from the EUX website:
Design leaders need to do more than hire, train, and mentor great craftspeople. They must get people to work together as an interdisciplinary team, bound by a shared vision of what a successful enterprise experience can be. We’ll explore how successful enterprise UX teams work to create, own, and execute their visions.

Phillip explained that this group of talks is about execution.  A key part of executing well is being able to handle it when things go wrong.  Each of us has worked in large enterprises for a number of years, and each of us enjoy thinking about the fine details of the craft.  But how we do that with teams, organizations that don’t know UX, or may be actively resisting it.  We don’t always think about the mechanics of getting things done.  Something has to go out the door, and it’s not going to be perfect.  We’re doing it wondering what we will face – but we know we have to deliver.  No matter the size of your team, execution matters.  Ultimately, we want to ensure that we’re helping massive organizations meet the needs of individuals.

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EUX17 – Crafting Enterprise Experiences

Crafting Enterprise Experiences

Theme Leader: Theresa Neil (Owner of Strategy + Design)

Abstract from the EUX website:
The enterprise setting forces us to redefine what “good” design means. We’ll explore how unique factors like complexity, scale, and lack of control can impact our craft and completely change our expectations.

Theresa Neil introduced the panel and said that the theme is really about how we make the space to practice our craft, and not just end up in a production role.  Tricia’s presentation is about about how to fix the broken model of corporate innovation. Robert will address how we get our arms around complexity.  And finally, Craig will speak about how we create resilient design in the enterprise.

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EUX17 – Opening Keynote

Exploring Cadence: You, Your Team, and Your Enterprise

Elizabeth Churchill (Director of User Experience, Google)

Abstract from the EUX website:
Time is always on our minds in very practical ways—apportioning it for various projects, creating and prioritizing tasks, calendaring, and tracking deadlines and deliverables. Time does, however, have more abstract qualities that require our attention. It drives how we imagine future worlds, set our organizations’ visions, track technological trends, manage our enterprises, plan our careers, roadmap our products, and choreograph our people. Each of these activities vary in scale and size, and each has its own cadence. Some focus on years, some on months, some on weeks, some on days. In this talk, Elizabeth Churchill will discuss ways of thinking about time in UX beyond classic, practical notions of “time management”. She’ll share personal stories from the enterprise and the academy, and invite a conversation about personal journeys of personal life long impact in UX.

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A New UX Maturity Model

As mentioned in my earlier post, for at least ten years now I have been collecting User Experience (UX) and Customer Experience (CX) Maturity Models.  I’ve never really been completely satisfied with the ones I’ve found, and the main reason has been that I felt that the framework and level of detail was not appropriate for the executives with whom I’m engaging with regularly.  Perhaps it’s because those models were created to guide and provoke dialogue with other UX professionals, which is also important, but not what I am trying to achieve.

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